Sunday, June 11, 2017

Scandinavian-Style Fish Cakes


If you live by the ocean, chances are there is a fish cake tradition floating about. New England, New Orleans, San Francisco, Seoul, Dan Nang or Cornwall… just about every culture has its own version of the fish cake. 

In the mostly water-bound reaches of Scandinavia, this is no exception. Fiskekaker is a true Scandinavian meal, an everyday dish symbolic of the seafood-heavy Nordic diet. But what if you live in the Midwest, as I do? While you won't find haddock or cod in this recipe, you will find potatoes and white-flesh freshwater fish. I chose Missouri River paddlefish for this recipe; it’s firm and fatty, resembling ocean fish. I have found it tastes quite close to tuna.

If paddlefish meat is not accessible, I suggest catfish, but any white-fleshed fish will work just fine. The beauty of this dish is that it's also fantastic with fish that you may not want to eat otherwise, such as carp, drum or bass. The seasonings in the recipe are merely suggestions; flavor your fish cakes with any herbs and spices you like.

For the full recipe, visit World Fishing Network online: http://www.worldfishingnetwork.com/recipes/post/scandinavian-style-fish-cakes-recipe

Monday, June 5, 2017

Fried Tacos with Wild Turkey and Chipotle


Most hunters I know just don’t know what to do with wild turkey legs. It’s true— these legs are tough, especially from a dominant, old tom turkey, and the pin bones can be intimidating to cook. For this reason, these underrated parts are often thrown away, and that’s a shame because that’s a ton of meat wasted; from just two turkey leg and thighs, I was able to make about 25 tacos for this recipe. And just because turkey may be considered a “white meat,” don’t be fooled. Wild animals are a different and their leg meat is dark and flavorful. However, you do have to put in some work to make them fit for the table. 

If you have a slow cooker, then you can cook turkey legs. It’s as easy as seasoning the legs and throwing it into the crockpot for a few hours to tenderize—no more difficult than slow cooking a roast. After 6 to 8 hours, the meat will be so tender that you can do anything with it. Use the meat in your favorite casseroles, soups, stir fries, BBQ sandwiches … or tacos. 

These turkey and chipotle fried tacos are by no means healthy, but I promise that they will be gobbled up so quickly. Remember those fast food Jack in the Box or Burger King fried tacos? They were filled with a weird meat paste that was so disgusting but also so addicting at the same time. Well, these tacos are all crunchy, greasy goodness—filled with wholesome ingredients hunted by you.

For the recipe, visit Outdoor Channel online:  http://www.outdoorchannel.com/article.aspx?id=52011&articletype=article&key=wild-turkey-leg-chipotle-fried-tacos-recipe
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